Workshops and Masterclass: more information

Workshop 1:
Shifting Organisations and Identities: towards Migrant Friendly Local Communities.

Time: Thursday, 6 December 2007, 9:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
Place: Flinders University, Humanities Room 133.
Maximum number of participants: 40.
Contact: Mary Lyons.

South Australia’s population policy relies on bringing in migrants and keeping them here. But migrants will only come and stay for the long term if we can successfully build harmonious and migrant friendly communities. Declaring your council a refugee-friendly or migrant-friendly zone is only the first step – it has to be followed up by many more steps that enable migrants to feel connected to the community. Fear of the unknown can lead to prejudice and discrimination on the part of the community, and the feeling of not being welcome on part of the migrant.

This workshop looks at the ‘nitty-gritty’ of building migrant friendly communities. It focuses on the work of local councils and civil society groups who are the heart of the process of building links between migrants and community. It asks a number of questions:

  • How are community groups, local government and businesses changing the way they work, and the way they think of themselves, to become more migrant friendly?
  • What kinds of human, cultural and social resources are useful in this process of change?
  • What strategies work, and what challenges have been met?

The workshop will be held over two and a half hours. The first hour will be taken up by short presentations from a panel of invited speakers from community and local government organisations, and questions and answers. After a brief break, we will break into small groups to discuss the themes raised by the panel, including the roles of volunteers, cultural associations, bi-cultural workers, local council cultural programs, and local businesses in opening communities to migrants.

Panel speakers include:

  • Elizabeth Sykora (Cultural Development Officer, City of Marion)
  • Rob Ball (The Marion International Association)
  • Hannah Paten (Project Coordinator, Refugee Services, Baptist Community Services (SA) Inc)

Please direct enquiries to Mary Lyons: mary.lyons@flinders.edu.au

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Workshop 2: The Power of Storying.

Time: Thursday, 6 December 2007, 1.30 p.m. - 3.30 p.m.
Place: Flinders University, Humanities Room 133.
Maximum number of participants: 30.
Contact: Mary Lyons.

In this workshop context, storying refers to collective or individual modes of expression that offer diverse and multifaceted perspectives on the positioning of new arrivals in the community, whether migrants, refugees or asylum seekers, or established members of a migrant community. Storying helps foster connections with the new environment, through a variety of means, whether through everyday conversation, experiential narrative, self-reflexivity, community media outlets or expression through numerous art forms. This workshop looks at the power of storying in locating, identifying and building migrant friendly communities. It focuses on how the stories are negotiated, communicated and under which circumstances they are facilitated.

The workshop discussion will pose a number of questions:

  • How are new and emerging communities, established communities and local government facilitating stories by new arrivals?
  • What kinds of human, cultural and social resources are being used to record and preserve the stories?
  • Who is the audience for these stories?

The workshop will be held over two hours. The first hour will be taken up by short presentations from a panel of invited speakers from local government and established, new and emerging communities, followed by questions and answers. After a brief break, we will divide into small groups to discuss the themes raised by the panel.

Panel speakers include:

  • Barbara Brown (Bachelor of Creative Arts (Hons))
  • Dr Noris Ioannou (Executive Director, Nexus Multicultural Arts Centre)
  • James Lino (BA, MA in Sociology and Anthropology, PhD candidate in the Discipline of Anthropology at the University of Adelaide)

Please direct enquiries to Mary Lyons: mary.lyons@flinders.edu.au

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Workshop 3: Migration Studies Workshop.

Time: Thursday, 6 December 2007, 10.00 a.m. - 12.00 p.m.
Place: Flinders University, Humanities Room 101.
Maximum number of participants: 25.
Contact: Nena Bierbaum.

The aim of the workshop is to discuss the participants' current research projects in the area of migration studies. It is primarily intended for postgraduate students and early career researchers who are seeking feedback on they doctoral work or other research projects in progress.

Professor Ros Pesman.
Ros Pesman is Professor Emeritus at the University of Sydney where she was previously Challis Professor of history and Pro-Vice-Chancellor for the College of Humanities and Social Sciences. She has worked and published in Italian Renaissance history and the history of travel and migration, and is presently working on Mazzini and the Italian Risorgimento exiles in Britain. Recent publications include Pier Soderini and the Ruling Class in Renaissane Florence (2002) and with Loretta Baldassar, From Paesani to Global Italians, Veneto Migrants in Australia (2005)

Please direct enquiries to Nena Bierbaum: nena.bierbaum@flinders.edu.au

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Workshop 4: "I have a great idea for a documentary!" From Memory to Screen.

Time: Thursday, 6 December 2007, 1.30 p.m. - 4.30 p.m.
Place: Flinders University, Humanities Room 113.
Maximum number of participants: 20.
Contact: Nena Bierbaum.

How do you bridge the gap between research and documentary production? This 3 hour practical workshop explores the processes involved in transforming archives, oral history and research into engaging documentary forms with powerful narratives.

Film makers Alison Wotherspoon and Viron Papadopoulos.

Please direct enquiries to Nena Bierbaum: nena.bierbaum@flinders.edu.au

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Memory/Nation/Culture: A Masterclass with Dr Susannah Radstone.

In association with the Flinders Humanities Research Centre.

Time: Thursday, 6 December 2007, 9.00 a.m. - 1.00 p.m.
Maximum number of participants: 15.
Contact: All enquiries must be directed to Dr Kate Douglas.

How do film, literature and other media ‘remember’ national pasts? Over the last
fifteen years or so, theories of cultural memory and trauma have had a profound
impact across the humanities, encouraging researchers at all levels to approach
novels, films and television as ‘memory media’. The same period has witnessed
the production of a wide range of films, novels and other art forms whose
concerns are with recent - and not so recent - national pasts, including W G
Sebald’s Austerlitz and Kate Grenville’s The Secret River, and the films
Amistad and Rabbit Proof Fence. Such texts have become the primary sources for
many studies of cultural, literary and film memory. But how do theories of
trauma and cultural memory help us to engage with national literatures and
cinemas and what are the most useful methods for the analysis of memory media?

Dr Susannah Radstone’s current research interests are in cultural memory at the
interface between the psyche, history and culture. Publications include The
Sexual Politics of Time: Confession, Nostalgia, Memory
(forthcoming December
2007); Memory and Methodology (2000) and The Politics of Memory: Contested
Pasts
(2005).She teaches in the School of Social Sciences, Media and Cultural
Studies at the University of East London and is currently senior visiting
fellow at the Australian Centre, University of Melbourne.

Please direct enquiries to Dr Kate Douglas: kate.douglas@flinders.edu.au

Flinders University